people at workHaving seen both good and bad I thought this would make an interesting blog. After having a chat with some of my industry peers I realized that some management teams don’t staff sufficiently and their SharePoint team and business users are suffering for it. Specifically, management staffs SharePoint teams like they would IT infratrsucture and not a business facing service.

With SharePoint being a global service in many organizations that have offices in the America, EMEA and ASIAPAC, SharePoint’s reach is broad and its user base very large. This places a huge support burden on IT departments as the support requirements are 7/24 and the must staff accordingly. The downside of not staffing correctly is higher than usual staff turn over, not meeting expected service levels and not containing costs.

So how staff? Here is a baseline model:

  • Executive sponsor – Owns budget and ultimately service quality and compliance with company policy. This is an active role, supporting the team during budgeting, downsize, escalations and being able to say NO to the business when resources are not available or the request is not in the best interest or suited to SharePoint.
  • Product Management – Owns product roadmap, new feature releases, risk planning, develops budget and other operating models. Works with other product managers to align roadmap such as Operating Systems, Database services and other related infrastructure. Also work with business unit and SharePoint User Group to collect establish two way communications.
  • Service Manager – manages the service to control plans for availability, performance and compliance. Deals with staffing, outages, escalations, reporting and problem management.
  • Business Analyst – works with business unit and user group community to facilitate and capture requirements. This role requires strong communications, knowledge of business, technology, writing and facilitation.
  • Engineer / Architect – work with business analyst and technical team on requirements to design enhancements and supports broader team from a technical perspective.
  • Developers – work on code, manage source code and documentation. Know and enforce development standards, know the customizations inside and out. The number of developers depends on size of environment and number of customization. there should be at least one that knows all the customizations to some degree.
  • Quality Assurance – develops test plans, test cases and reports for testing new features and performance ongoing. Maintain quality assurance environment such as data set, toolsets and related documentation.
  • Administration onshore (Day) – day to day administration which includes Help Desk, service sustainment, provisioning, service packs and other changes.
  • Administration off shore (Night) – day to day administration which includes Help Desk, service sustainment, provisioning, service packs and other changes.

The aforementioned model assumes you have teams allocated to shared services such as help desk, monitoring and reporting, coding and source code management, networking, servers, compliance/risk management, storage and quality assurance.

It’s important to remember that most organizations rate SharePoint as a Administration level application or tier 3 or 4 – whatever is lowest in your organization. As a result its not allocated the same funding and attention a mission critical tier 1 or 2 application but that doesn’t stop business units from building mission critical applications and there in-lies the political rub – the disconnect that makes life difficult.

Have feedback? Send me your ideas roncharity@gmail.com

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